Textual Parallels: Answering Jonathan

I’m getting back to the point that Jonathan raised on the post below. I keep exploring the issue of how to look at and construct parallels from a number of angles and as I consider a new project I’m embarking on (or will if my PMR abstract is accepted) I’ve got some more thoughts.

Jonathan’s defending paper parallels, And let me say, I am a fan of apaper parallels, and believe strongly that students of the New Testament and preachers need to own a copy of Throckmorton’s Gospel Parallels and be well versed in its use.

That having been said, I’m thinking about stages in a research project. There are some points where a static parallel is handy; others when it is less so. That is, as you go, you starting noticing things that require different different kinds of parallel examination that you wouldn’t have realized without the prior work.

I’m getting more and more keen on XML and the potential it offers for introducing markup into a text as you go. As I’m envisioning it, once you have uniform markup in a certain constellation of texts, different XSLT configurations could be used to display different kinds of parallels—or parallels within the same text given the right kinds of controls.

If the PMR presentation does get accepted I’ll try and put this into practice and see how well it works.

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1 comment so far

  1. Jonathan Jarrett on

    I’m slightly frightened to have provoked this much thought on your part given er, how much less there was in my comment! But when you say, “That is, as you go, you starting noticing things that require different kinds of parallel examination that you wouldn’t have realized without the prior work”, I have to say, surely this is simply because you are reviewing the data. Any way you can use to look at your data a different way is helpful, right? This is something that software makes a lot easier—multiple queries from the same database and so on—but it’s labour-saving rather than something absolutely impossible by other means.


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